Think big. The vision: green heavy industry. This needn’t be utopian, as industries with high carbon dioxide emissions can technically use green hydrogen. Hydrogen itself is already being used on a large scale, but due to reasons of costs and others, it is not yet being produced “green”. Work is underway to change that.

The industrial sector already requires large amounts of hydrogen today. In most cases, this is produced from fossil fuels and thus causes significant emissions. From a technical perspective, a switch to green hydrogen is feasible, but it is not yet economically viable. This is due to the current high costs still associated with the technology and the existing regulatory framework.

A first regulatory approach is the revision of the Renewable Energy Directive (REDII) of the European Commission. If the directive is implemented at national level, an instrument can be created that will encourage the use of green hydrogen in refineries. At the same time, the technological and regulatory integration of hydrogen technology into the energy system is being investigated in the so-called “living laboratories” of the Federal Ministry of Economics and Energy, which are accompanying the energy transition. These measures can lead to an initial market scaling of the technology and thus significant cost reductions. In the medium and long term, this would also enable the use of green hydrogen for the decarbonisation of heavy industry and other emission-intensive sectors. Green hydrogen is often the only option for sustainable decarbonisation in these sectors.

Think big. The vision: green heavy industry. This needn't be utopian, as industries with high carbon dioxide emissions can technically use green hydrogen. Hydrogen itself is already being used on a large scale, but due to reasons of costs and others, it is not yet being produced “green”. Work is underway to change that.

The industrial sector already requires large amounts of hydrogen today. In most cases, this is produced from fossil fuels and thus causes significant emissions. From a technical perspective, a switch to green hydrogen is feasible, but it is not yet economically viable. This is due to the current high costs still associated with the technology and the existing regulatory framework.

A first regulatory approach is the revision of the Renewable Energy Directive (REDII) of the European Commission. If the directive is implemented at national level, an instrument can be created that will encourage the use of green hydrogen in refineries. At the same time, the technological and regulatory integration of hydrogen technology into the energy system is being investigated in the so-called “living laboratories” of the Federal Ministry of Economics and Energy, which are accompanying the energy transition. These measures can lead to an initial market scaling of the technology and thus significant cost reductions. In the medium and long term, this would also enable the use of green hydrogen for the decarbonisation of heavy industry and other emission-intensive sectors. Green hydrogen is often the only option for sustainable decarbonisation in these sectors.